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RichardCheatham - City AFC

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7356 posts
First used 09/01/17

#1
15/10/2018 at 02:45

https://www.theguardian.com/football/blog /2018/oct/14/brian-lenihan-football-menta l-health-hull-city

Nothing new, but a reminder of his misfortune. 

Bunkers Hill - See you in the next life 

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KingstonKid

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#2
15/10/2018 at 11:04

Sad story, hope he can overcome this. 

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potential

2280 posts
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#3
15/10/2018 at 14:36

A youths dreams of professional football dashed on the bench, day after day training hoping for the nod, or day to day in the treatment room. There must be hundreds like him. 

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RichardCheatham - City AFC

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#4
15/10/2018 at 15:12

Despite the bollocks you hear on Super .sunday etc, most footballers have small groups and it’s not one big happy family.

Can you imagine what it was like during the Allam years. 

Bunkers Hill - See you in the next life 

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essexgull

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First used 12/01/17

#5
15/10/2018 at 15:13

It is sad and I hope he manages to control his mental health, but is it any different from any other 23 year old who hasn't achieved the career that they want?

What makes being unable to play professional football any different from being unable to make the grades to becoming a doctor, for example? Or having a business that goes bankrupt? A failed acting or music career?

Mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety, clearly exist and as a community we try to help victims of it, but there is a requirement to teach a certain level of resilience to accepting failure (for whatever reason) and moving on. I do have sympathy for him, but at the end of the day, he's not been diagnosed with terminal cancer or HIV, he's been told that his body isnt capable of playing a professional sport at a relatively young age. There's a whole network within professional football to enable retired players to retrain in something related to remain in the industry. Many in other jobs don't have this extra help.

I know some will interpret my opinions as being mean and you'll have to believe me when I say that that is not the intention, just that perhaps he needs a father figure who can explain that life is full of obstacles, disasters and dead ends and that there are ways of coping and moving forward without allowing yourself to fall into a pit of despair.


ESSEX GULL




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RichardCheatham - City AFC

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7356 posts
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#6
15/10/2018 at 15:36

I’d agree with that Gull. Sympathy all the way for the fella but I am not convinced all those that are now reaching out have looked at their own level of resilience first.

It’s possibly part of the new demographic. My kids get in the shit and the first thing they do is ring me. I would not and did not ask my old man for help when in the crapper.

It must be devastating when you don’t reach the goals set in professional football but I don’t believe the dedication required is anything like the sacrifices made in some other sports that perhaps don’t have the riches that football has at the highest level.

It must have been a factor for most players that they may get cut or have a poor injury record. I might have got this wrong but I understood it wasn’t the injuries that led to his departure from the game but the stress of playing, which is probably a different problem.

Seems like he did the right thing anyway. 

Bunkers Hill - See you in the next life 

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theotherphantom

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#7
16/10/2018 at 00:08

There's been a big change in parenting in the last 30-odd years. It's had unintended consequences. Most on here were allowed to roam free in their younger days. Most on here did not have a childhood micromanaged by paranoid parents. Those that were allowed to roam free learnt conflict resolution from their peers. Most on here did not feel under intense pressure at school. Many kids these days weren't taught or weren't allowed to learn or just didn't need to learn essential survival skills they should have had ample opportunities to acquite.

On the topic of footballers, even those of us on here that left home for work soon created a new circle of friends and a new support group, both within fairly easy reach, and not ripped asunder by being sent to far-flung unknown cities for some months, followed by several more far-flung cities for other indeterminate periods of time, all beyond our control, in an endless random string, all populated by complete strangers. 

>>>>> 12th season in exile <<<<< 

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