RSS Feed Share on Facebook Send this to Twitter | Login Login | Register
City Independent
The Hull City Fanzine
 
Hull City Forum

Hull City Forum

Deails Post
23 posts. < 1 2 > Show 15 30

New Back To Top

The Prince of Munster

8432 posts
First used 20/01/17

Group
Hull City

#1
19/10/2018 at 18:19

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40726868

I really don’t think these will take off.

A more viable solution would be to reduce the amount we use diesel an petrol cars by increases in road tax, insurance taxes and congestion charges. 

New Back To Top

essexgull

8826 posts
First used 12/01/17

#2
19/10/2018 at 21:30

It depends if the government invest in the charging infrastructure, as this is the key to electric car success. There's nothing to stop lampposts along roads from being converted to charging outlets also. Also to use as gallows for hanging paedophiles and Remoaners.

It's taken off where I live - 50% of cars sold to private customers are electric or hybrid. All car parks have charging points, charge stations exist in cities. Lower servicing and repair costs also, as fewer moving parts.

The issue is they they came with road tax subsidies, no toll payments and lowered tax and parking costs, to encourage their purchase and to represent the less environmental impact. As soon as they became more popular, the government has already started removing these benefits.. Why increase the charges if we're reducing environmental impact other than for obvious reasons.. Got to subsidise those on bennos to get their free public transport travel, i suppose.

Most families have two cars, an electric one for the wife's commute and to drive around a city or town is ideal.


ESSEX GULL  

New Back To Top

theotherphantom

User Image

12633 posts
First used 09/01/17

Group
Hull City

#3
20/10/2018 at 05:30

Quote Quote by The Prince of Munster on 19/10/2018 at 18:19
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40726868

I really don’t think these will take off.

A more viable solution would be to reduce the amount we use diesel an petrol cars by increases in road tax, insurance taxes and congestion charges.


For the last 20+ years, the government and police had done their level best to reduce traffic in built-up areas to a crawl with their mendaciously entitled "traffic calming" measures. This has been in an attempt to chip away at the annual road death figures. If traffic wasn't forcibly calmed by increasing fines on motorists who dare to get out of second and by road designers building congestion and delay into their planning, there'd be less static traffic and less pollution in built-up areas. So what's it worth - is 10 lives on the road worth another 500 deaths from pollution? I blame the governments, the police, and the knee-jerk newspapers or this. British road safety is among the best few in the world, and yet stupid government and braindead plod, in their standard non-joined-up thinking mode would rather transfer and multiply the problem. Moronic twats.  

>>>>> 12th season in exile <<<<< 

New Back To Top

essexgull

8826 posts
First used 12/01/17

#4
20/10/2018 at 13:14

Exactly. Allow the British public clean air, so they can die from obesity instead.


ESSEX GULL  

New Back To Top

theotherphantom

User Image

12633 posts
First used 09/01/17

Group
Hull City

#5
20/10/2018 at 19:17

Or something else, certainly.

I saw an interesting video the other day from an Australian company who reckon they can harvest carbon dioxide from the air and combine it with whatever to make fuel that would be far cleaner for cars with internal combustion engines to run on. They believe they can harvest more than they would reuse for fuel, even with their fuel product in mass use, reducing the amount in the atmosphere. That would keep petrol vehicles on the road indefinitely.

I've no idea if their claims are valid. 

Post edited on 20/10/2018 at 19:18 by theotherphantom

>>>>> 12th season in exile <<<<< 

New Back To Top

essexgull

8826 posts
First used 12/01/17

#6
20/10/2018 at 21:29

What's more interesting is how the US car industry lobbied government to have minimal subsidies for public transport and against functional pedestrianised city planning to encourage car purchase and how as a result of this, the fast food industry and hence, obesity occurred to such an extent in the US.


ESSEX GULL  

New Back To Top

theotherphantom

User Image

12633 posts
First used 09/01/17

Group
Hull City

#7
20/10/2018 at 23:14

Quote Quote by essexgull on 20/10/2018 at 21:29
What's more interesting is how the US car industry lobbied government to have minimal subsidies for public transport and against functional pedestrianised city planning to encourage car purchase and how as a result of this, the fast food industry and hence, obesity occurred to such an extent in the US.


ESSEX GULL


Not to mention the US habit of ransacking the world to claim oil, to suppress alternative/greener means of transport, etc, etc. 

>>>>> 12th season in exile <<<<< 

New Back To Top

candw

User Image

26380 posts
First used 09/01/17

#8
21/10/2018 at 11:30

A more viable solution would be to reduce the amount we use diesel an petrol cars by increases in road tax, insurance taxes and congestion charges.

I'm sure you didn't mean "keep the poorer folk off the roads" PoM. Did you?

New Back To Top

The Prince of Munster

8432 posts
First used 20/01/17

Group
Hull City

#9
21/10/2018 at 19:27

Quote Quote by candw on 21/10/2018 at 11:30
A more viable solution would be to reduce the amount we use diesel an petrol cars by increases in road tax, insurance taxes and congestion charges.

I'm sure you didn't mean "keep the poorer folk off the roads" PoM. Did you?


Unfortunately the world we live in means not everyone can afford a 5l Ford Mustang.

The above suggestion will probably make the likes of you and I consider whether two cars in a household is completely necessary and/or if alternative transport is more viable/cost effective.

I don’t think electric cars are the answer due to the charging problems, especially for longer journeys. 

New Back To Top

essexgull

8826 posts
First used 12/01/17

#10
21/10/2018 at 19:56

The latest Kias, Teslas and hyundais have a reach of ca. 400km. It's not so often many drive more than that in a day, so charging overnight works. Battery advances being what they are mean that this reach will be further in the future.

I have a friend who drove from Norway to Greece in a Tesla and used the interface to plan charging points the whole way for the 3 day drive.

In the meantime, a hybrid works fine - on electric for the commute, shopping trips etc. As good for ca. 80km, then flip over to petrol for the longer motorway journeys.


ESSEX GULL  

New Back To Top

essexgull

8826 posts
First used 12/01/17

#11
21/10/2018 at 19:59

If you drive 30,000km a year, switching to electric saves you a couple of thousand pounds a year in fuel costs. It's just logic. The issue is how well the UK government will prepare the infrastructure.


ESSEX GULL  

New Back To Top

The Prince of Munster

8432 posts
First used 20/01/17

Group
Hull City

#12
21/10/2018 at 23:22

Quote Quote by essexgull on 21/10/2018 at 19:56
The latest Kias, Teslas and hyundais have a reach of ca. 400km. It's not so often many drive more than that in a day, so charging overnight works. Battery advances being what they are mean that this reach will be further in the future.

I have a friend who drove from Norway to Greece in a Tesla and used the interface to plan charging points the whole way for the 3 day drive.

In the meantime, a hybrid works fine - on electric for the commute, shopping trips etc. As good for ca. 80km, then flip over to petrol for the longer motorway journeys.


ESSEX GULL


Time will tell, I suppose. I’m not sure a Tesla is affordable to most, old bean.

New Back To Top

essexgull

8826 posts
First used 12/01/17

#13
25/10/2018 at 17:23

An electric Hyundai is £30k and the battery is guaranteed for 8 years and the warranty on the car is 7 years. Road tax next to nothing. So £4k a year for the 'life' of the car, plus the savings on fuel. Hardly out of the average families' reach.


I'm a convert.


ESSEX GULL  

New Back To Top

The Prince of Munster

8432 posts
First used 20/01/17

Group
Hull City

#14
25/10/2018 at 20:55

That electric car you talk of is a hybrid. Are they going to be allowed post 2030/40? 

New Back To Top

essexgull

8826 posts
First used 12/01/17

#15
26/10/2018 at 15:33

There is an all electric model but either way, I don't know what will be allowed in 2040. The car will have long served it's purpose by then.

There's a reason why Jaguar Land Rover is suffering. The convenient blame is placed on Brexit, but the real reason is that they invested heavily in diesel tech and engines, when the rest of the car makers are investigating electric.

The UK is generally quite reluctant to embrace modernity, but the simple issue is economics. The service and guarantees on new electric Nd hybrid models are good to attract buyers and long term tax and fuel costs are lower. Why waste money on something that sits on the driveway slowly corroding and fast depreciating to impress the neighbours.


ESSEX GULL  

23 posts. < 1 2 > Show 15 30