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exiled CITY AFC

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11466 posts
First used 11/01/17

#1
12/07/2017 at 13:26

1975

Just saying like  

Let it never be said that I was silent when they needed me - William Wilberforce 

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candw

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26502 posts
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#2
12/07/2017 at 14:44

LOLZ!

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essexgull

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First used 12/01/17

#3
12/07/2017 at 15:54

And yet housing and in-work benefits are at an all time relative high...

Good for the private sector - employ someone on an appalling contract for next to nothing wages and the tax-payer will make up the difference to enable the employee and their family to live. No wonder productivity is so low, why would the private sector need to bother improving it, when they're being part-funded by the people of the UK. Not a Corbyn supporter but fully understand why many are.

Unemployment figures aren't worth a penny regarding real economy anymore.


ESSEX GULL 

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Dr Victor Ehrlich

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#4
12/07/2017 at 22:00

For workers at Soap & Co in Westfield shopping centre in London it's 1975 rates of pay, great news if you're a cunt! Still, it makes the employment figures look good. Scotland Diamonds 9

Hold that Otis, Nurse Redding 

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candw

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#5
12/07/2017 at 22:29

Before I'd heard of Zero Hour contracts, I had one. Now hundreds of thousands have them. No wonder productivity is shit.

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charon-the-ferryman

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#6
12/07/2017 at 22:36

I had a zero hour contract in the early seventies - 32.5p per hour, no problem - today's snowflakes are a bunch of fannies, they've never had it so good 

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Dr Victor Ehrlich

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#7
12/07/2017 at 22:56

Quote Quote by charon-the-ferryman on 12/07/2017 at 22:36
I had a zero hour contract in the early seventies - 32.5p per hour, no problem - today's snowflakes are a bunch of fannies, they've never had it so good

Some of 'em have never had it, and those that think things were better years ago are daft cunts, FACT! ScotlandDiamonds 9

Hold that Otis, Nurse Redding 

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candw

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#8
13/07/2017 at 07:35

Quote Quote by charon-the-ferryman on 12/07/2017 at 22:36
I had a zero hour contract in the early seventies - 32.5p per hour, no problem - today's snowflakes are a bunch of fannies, they've never had it so good


It's thick, working class cunts like you, touching you're forelock and being ever so 'umble as you accept your crumbs, that has led to a country saturated with (often hidden) money at the top and the chink of pennies below. Well fucking done!

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Obadiah

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#9
13/07/2017 at 09:43

Quote Quote by Dr Victor Ehrlich on 12/07/2017 at 22:56

Some of 'em have never had it, and those that think things were better years ago are daft cunts, FACT! ScotlandDiamonds 9


I agree some of them didn't have it. Although for large numbers of workers things were better years ago. 12 months unemployment pay as of right. 6 months extra benefit if you'd paid enough national insurance contributions. Decent jobs in banking, insurance, the council, civil service and the nationalised industries. All with final figure pensions, most of them indexed linked.

Apprenticeships with an employer and a job at the end of it.

Add in subsidised council housing, VAT at less than 9% and low gas, electric and rates (council tax) bills.

Finally, there was being able to afford an house at 20 on less than a salary of £4,000 a year. The equivalent now would be around £21,000.

In the last 40 years there has been a huge transfer of wealth from the working class to the very wealthy.  

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imperishablehcfc

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#10
13/07/2017 at 10:09

Define working class Obi

Although with 2 daughters in their 20's I too worry about the situation confronting young people on the flip side today's young people are very often doing a lot more with their lives nowadays before they settle down and buy that house.

Regards the 20 year old you referred to, what amount of foreign travel had they done before their house purchase, what age were they likely to have either seriously partnered up or even got married to help with affording their 4000 purchase. What car did they own? What age of house did they buy and how quickly and what standard of kitting out did they enjoy, etc etc.

When we bought our first house in 1988 (at the age of 26) for 25K I had a decent job but we still struggled for a few years with a 23500 mortgage. We had a knackered ford escort mk2, I'd been on 1 foreign holiday for a fortnight and a couple of long weekends, after moving in with various bit and bobs of 2nd hand furniture we systematically did up the house and garden and completed the last room 11 year later ironically just before we sold and moved to another house. We did things as we could afford them

With the exception of a few obvious hot-spots youngish people I know are still getting on the property market but probably 5-10 years later than I did. How much of this is choice vs necessity? Those that appear to be doing best are those that have managed to avoid the credit trap, are in a stable relationship, and are more measured with their expectations, they also never blew 25K on a big fat gypsy style wedding. Has this changed that much, i.e. more grounded, financially intelligent people do better for themselves? the problem is there seems to be a lot less of them nowadays as we live in a 'got to have it now' society

It's easy to blame those nasty wealthy people but it's that type of lack of responsibility for one's own position that contributes to a lot of people's downfall.

Fuck the short term we will build a 1000 year Hull City Reich 

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essexgull

8980 posts
First used 12/01/17

#11
13/07/2017 at 14:06

Your daughters will have left university with a 25-40k debt, Peri old bean. If you went to university in the 1980s you would have left almost flat. That's a huge difference in prepping for life.


EG 

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Obadiah

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6475 posts
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#12
13/07/2017 at 14:54

Quote Quote by imperishablehcfc on 13/07/2017 at 10:09
Define working class Obi

Although with 2 daughters in their 20's I too worry about the situation confronting young people on the flip side today's young people are very often doing a lot more with their lives nowadays before they settle down and buy that house.

Regards the 20 year old you referred to, what amount of foreign travel had they done before their house purchase, what age were they likely to have either seriously partnered up or even got married to help with affording their 4000 purchase. What car did they own? What age of house did they buy and how quickly and what standard of kitting out did they enjoy, etc etc.

When we bought our first house in 1988 (at the age of 26) for 25K I had a decent job but we still struggled for a few years with a 23500 mortgage. We had a knackered ford escort mk2, I'd been on 1 foreign holiday for a fortnight and a couple of long weekends, after moving in with various bit and bobs of 2nd hand furniture we systematically did up the house and garden and completed the last room 11 year later ironically just before we sold and moved to another house. We did things as we could afford them

With the exception of a few obvious hot-spots youngish people I know are still getting on the property market but probably 5-10 years later than I did. How much of this is choice vs necessity? Those that appear to be doing best are those that have managed to avoid the credit trap, are in a stable relationship, and are more measured with their expectations, they also never blew 25K on a big fat gypsy style wedding. Has this changed that much, i.e. more grounded, financially intelligent people do better for themselves? the problem is there seems to be a lot less of them nowadays as we live in a 'got to have it now' society

It's easy to blame those nasty wealthy people but it's that type of lack of responsibility for one's own position that contributes to a lot of people's downfall.



The house was a two bedroom bungalow. It was bought for £7,000, with a deposit of £700. We could only borrow 3 times our income and it was close to our borrowing limit. It was furnished second hand, mostly begged from our families. I was married and our total income was less than £4,000. Come to think of it, our income may have been closer to £2,500. We hadn't had an holiday never mind a foreign one. We'd saved for the deposit and legal fees for over a year. 2 and half years later we sold it for a profit and moved back to Hull were we did the same.

We gout our first car 2 or 3 years after moving back to Hull. It was a viva that cost £100. 

Post edited on 13/07/2017 at 14:56 by Obadiah

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essexgull

8980 posts
First used 12/01/17

#13
13/07/2017 at 15:41

First car - Vauxhall Astra £1700 when I was 18, bought from a small inheritance I received - a total waste of money as car was scrapped 9 months later. That is the most painful financial loss I have experienced in my life as the money behind it was 'personal' and so I felt guilty for not investing it wisely as the old girl who bequeathed it to me had lived a spartan life.
First house was a flat bought when I was 25 - £280k, £70k deposit, rest mortgage. It actually 'lost' value for the first three to five years after I bought it, then trebled in value over the next 15 years. Thoroughly ridiculous market move that comes with the population of an island increasing by 6 million.
My first job out of university, I began on a £32k salary - 28 years later now, for the equivalent position, a new graduate has to work approximately 6 months for free in New York or London to be accepted into the role and the eventual salary if a job offer is made isn't that much higher than what I received, so it's borderline impossible for a working class student, without supportive family or the ability to scam a loan from a bank manager, to survive. When I went for my interviews, every other candidate was English, now they're competing with students from the global market.

I am in no doubt that I had it much easier than my children. Not sure why any of us would deny it.



ESSEX GULL






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candw

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26502 posts
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#14
13/07/2017 at 17:57

First car Ford 100E, cost £40 and I sold it back the day before I went to Zambia for £12. Changed the notes at Lusaka airport for Zambian Kwacha.

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The Prince of Munster

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#15
13/07/2017 at 20:52

Things haven't gone up that much in price, then Candy (assuming you bought your Ford in the 60s/70s. My first car was a Fiat Uno costing £100, back in the dark days of 2004 or 5 I think. 

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